Robotics Education & Competition Foundation
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Official Q&A: VRC 2023-2024: Over Under

Usage Guidelines All Questions

Contact with piece of other teams robot


JHAWK
18-Feb-2024

G6 states:

Keep your Robots together. Robots may not intentionally detach parts during the Match or leave mechanisms on the field. Note: Parts which become detached unintentionally and therefore a Minor Violation are no longer considered “part of a Robot,” and should be ignored for the purposes of any rules which involve Robot contact or location (e.g., Scoring, Double-Zone, etc.) or Robot size.

The definition of elevated states:

Elevated – A Robot status. A Robot is considered Elevated at the end of the Match if it meets the following criteria: The Robot is contacting at least one of the following: One or more of their Alliance’sElevation Bars Any portion of the Barrier that is on their Alliance’s side of the Neutral Zone (i.e., the three black PVC pipes that are attached directly to their Alliance’sElevation Bars). An Alliance partner Robot which meets the requirements of points 1-3 in this definition The Robot is not contacting any Field Elements other than those listed in point 1. This includes gray field tiles, the field perimeter, Goals, the opposing Alliance’sElevation Bar, etc. Contact with (or Possession of) Triballs is irrelevant when determining a Robot’s Elevated status. The Robot is not contacting the yellow Elevation Bar Cap. (VEX U and VAIRC only) The Robot is not contacting an Alliance partner Robot that is not considered Elevated.

A part falls off a red alliance robot (a rubber band in the example picture shown below) and becomes entangled with a blue alliance robot. The blue alliance robot goes to elevate at the end of the match, and they meet all of the points listed above. However, the piece of the red alliance robot is in contact with both their robot and the ground. How should this be scored? Nothing seems to disqualify a team from being elevated, but what would be the best way to prove that a part did not originate from their robot? Additionally, would this scenario be any different if the rubber band had fallen off of the other red alliance robot.

And example photo. The orange rubber band is not part of the team who elevated's robot. https://media.discordapp.net/attachments/1118549255578210336/1208808131451424868/IMG_3933.jpg?ex=65e4a14d&is=65d22c4d&hm=6904331dcc5cb5d4e1bab8c7ffa04d3392ab2bfc8dc9f3c89b2c32a9c5e5cbc5&=&format=webp&width=1228&height=921

G6  
Answered by committee
28-Feb-2024

A part falls off a red alliance robot (a rubber band in the example picture shown below) and becomes entangled with a blue alliance robot. The blue alliance robot goes to elevate at the end of the match, and they meet all of the points listed above. However, the piece of the red alliance robot is in contact with both their robot and the ground. How should this be scored? Nothing seems to disqualify a team from being elevated, but what would be the best way to prove that a part did not originate from their robot? Additionally, would this scenario be any different if the rubber band had fallen off of the other red alliance robot.

Cases like the one you've described are subject to the Head Referee's judgment, although we can provide some very general guidance.

If it is clear that the disqualifying piece (in your case, an orange rubber band) did not originate with the Robot, the Head Referee could reasonably rule that the Robot still qualifies as Elevated. For example, it's not difficult to deduce what happened when a broken orange rubber band is caught on a Robot that doesn't use orange rubber bands anywhere, but another Robot on the Field includes them.

However, if the Head Referee determines that the part could have originated with that Robot, it will count as being part of that Robot and will invalidate the Elevation.