Official Q&A: VIQC 2019-2020: Squared Away Usage Guidelines

Balls Supported By Field Perimeter


Jon Kitagawa (Event Partner)
5 months ago

Would balls that are supported by the field perimeter be considered scored?

The definition of scored in the game manual states:

Scored - A Game Object is Scored if it satisfies one of the following conditions, and is not touching a Robot.

  • a. A Ball is Scored inside of a Cube if it meets the following criteria:
  • i. The Ball is at least partially within the three-dimensional volume defined by the outer edges of the Cube’s structure.
  • ii. The Ball is not contacting the Floor “outside” of the Cube. The portion of the Floor which is “outside” of the Cube is roughly defined as a vertical projection of the Cube onto the Floor beneath the Cube, regardless of the Cube’s orientation.

Therefore would this be considered scored according to the definition. i.imgur.com/uUQzYhM.jpg

This makes it very difficult for our referees to check each ball in the corner, especially when multiple balls are supported in this way and direct vision is obstructed. How should referees go about checking for scored balls in this position when they cannot directly see the balls. Should referees move move other balls or objects so they can see clearly? If so, what are the best practices for doing this?

Answered by Game Design Committee

Based on the image you have provided, the Ball appears to:

i) Clearly be partially within the three-dimensional volume defined by the outer edges of the Cube's structure.

ii) Clearly be not contacting the Floor "outside" of the Cube.

Therefore, it should be considered Scored inside of a Cube. The Field Perimeter has no bearing on the two criteria listed in the Game Manual.

How should referees go about checking for scored balls in this position when they cannot directly see the balls. Should referees move move other balls or objects so they can see clearly? If so, what are the best practices for doing this?

The definition of Scored goes on beyond what you have quoted to state the following:

Teams may encounter other Ball/Cube states than the examples depicted in the figures below. In these cases, as long as Ball satisfies criteria “a” and does not clearly violate criteria “b”, then the Ball should generally be considered Scored inside of a Cube. Teams will be given the “benefit of the doubt” in these judgment calls, as Head Referees will not be expected or required to define a perfectly rigid imaginary vertical projection or check minute measurements.

In a case where a given Ball is "too close to call" or otherwise obscured, then Head Referees should give the "benefit of the doubt" to the Teams and consider the Ball to be Scored inside of the Cube.